Septuagint - New English Translation

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A new translation of the Septuagint published by Oxford University. A New English Translation of the Septuagint (or NETS, as it is commonly designated), is a scholarly translation made by a group of scholars. It renders the Septuagint into 21st century English, based on the style of the New Revised Standard Bible.
1027 pp. Hardback.

The NETS translators worked from a critical Greek text. The NETS translators used the New Revised Standard Version as the underlying basis of their translation. Their purpose in this was to make the Hebrew Masoretic text the fundamental Old Testament document and to treat the Septuagint as an intermediary translation, lying midway between the Hebrew and the NETS translation.

Another difference between NETS and the previous translations of the Septuagint, is that NETS is not aimed at the average Christian reader. Rather, it is targeted at a well-educated, scholarly audience. It contains extensive textual notes in the introductions to each Bible book. In addition, rather than rendering Old Testament names into their familiar English forms, the NETS translators use forms more familiar to the ancient Greek readers. So instead of finding Moses, the NETS reader will find Moyses. Instead of Joshua, he will find Iesous.

As a result, the average Christian will find the NETS edition difficult to use for everyday Bible reading. Instead, it will better serve as a Biblical reference work for comparison with the other translations of the Septuagint, or with Old Testament passages translated from the Masoretic text.
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Septuagint - New English Translation
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Featured positive reviews:

Septuagint - New English Translation
 
 
A scholarly work02/20/2009
By David Bercot
I waited for several years in anticipation of the release of this fresh translation of the Septuagint. Coming from Oxford Press, I was afraid it would come with an $80 price tag, like so many of their books. So I was pleasantly surprised that they released it at such a reasonable price. This new translation of the Septuagint is very readable, and I would give it a 5-star rating except for a terrible editorial decision made by the committee in charge. Instead of translating the various proper names into their normal English equivalents, the translators simply transliterate the Greek spellings. For example, Jesus (Joshua) becomes Iesous, Moses becomes Moyses, and Jacob becomes Iakob. I find this extremely distracting, as I think will most other readers.
Septuagint - New English Translation
 
 
A scholarly work02/21/2009
By David Bercot
I waited for several years in anticipation of the release of this fresh translation of the Septuagint from Oxford Press. This new translation of the Septuagint is very readable, and I would give it a 5-star rating except for two things: (1) Instead of translating the various proper names into their normal English equivalents, the translators simply transliterate the Greek spellings. For example, Jesus (Joshua) becomes Iesous, Moses becomes Moyses, and Jacob becomes Iakob. I find this extremely distracting, as I think will most other readers. (2) The translators use the liberal NRSV for the base model. Despite these drawbacks, I find this translation useful for research and comparison.
Septuagint - New English Translation
 
 
An excellent work04/24/2010
By Kobie
I am amazed that a reviewer could say the NETS lacks the apocrypha. It contains the whole Septuagint text. I think it is the best translation of the Septuagint up to now. For some it might become to detailed, but then you can skip the footnotes.

Featured negative reviews:

Septuagint - New English Translation
 
 
A New English Translation of the Septuagint02/14/2009
By a Christian pilgrim
I use this translation for comparison with other Septuagint versions in English. It is apparently a work by and for academics. While readable, it lacks beauty of phrase. It also lacks the pre-Masoretic Septuagint Scriptures, which Protestants call the Apocrypha.